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filed under Independent Business | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Nov 13, 2013

Letter from Leading Environmentalists Calling for Change at Walmart

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/walmart-climate-letter/

We are writing today as leaders of some of the nation’s leading environmental organizations. We are coming together to demand real changes from Walmart – whose greenhouse gas emissions continue to exceed those of many countries. Despite its recent PR events on renewable energy, the truth is that Walmart lags far behind many other retailers… Continue reading

Photo: Walmart truck
Featured Article, Resource filed under Independent Business | Written by Stacy Mitchell | No Comments | Updated on Nov 13, 2013

New Report Reveals Walmart’s Climate Impact

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/walmart-climate/

Today, ILSR issued a report on Walmart’s rapidly expanding climate pollution and joined with leading environmental organizations in calling for change. The new report, Walmart’s Assault on the Climate: The Truth Behind One of the Biggest Climate Polluters and Slickest Greenwashers in America, finds: Nearly a decade after launching its sustainability campaign, Walmart’s greenhouse gas… Continue reading

Article filed under Independent Business | Written by Stacy Mitchell | No Comments | Updated on Sep 1, 2003

Retail Sprawl Impairing Nation’s Waterways

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/retail-sprawl-impairing-nations-waterways/

As big box stores and chain retailers consume more and more undeveloped land, polluted runoff from their parking lots is placing an ever greater burden on the nation’s rivers, lakes, and coastal waters. Storm water control measures and filtration systems produce only modest improvement, according to experts. A better solution is to channel commerce back into compact downtowns and neighborhood business districts, which are far less polluting. Continue reading