Connectivity in Indigenous Communities, New Report Available

Connectivity in Indigenous Communities, New Report Available

Date: 6 Apr 2018 | posted in: MuniNetworks | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

In November 2017, about 200 people attended the first Indigenous Connectivity Summit in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The summit brought together activists, network administrators, researchers, and many more to consider the successes and challenges in improving Internet access in indigenous communities. The Internet Society has released the Indigenous Connectivity Summit Community Report outlining next steps on leaving the summit.

I was on the ground in Santa Fe and experienced first-hand the collaborative discussions that took place. Although brief, this report contains the key takeaways from these conversations. The saying, “for the Community, with the Community, by the Community,” appears as a title in the report and was a constant refrain during the summit. If we are to have affordable, reliable Internet access in our communities, we must have an active role in creating the solution.

Highlights from the Report

The ten page document outlines recommendations on what will make this possible. Some of these action items are creating sustainable connectivity and building capacity within our communities. Policies that can support these goals include making spectrum easier to access, developing collaborative backhaul solutions, and collecting better data on connectivity.

The report underscores how Internet access relates to native nations’ autonomy and self-determination. Internet access can support cultural revitalization and language preservation as well as economic development. The summit offered a creative space to dive into the details and learn from one another.

More Info

Read the report on the Internet Society’s website or download it here If you want to get into more details or to experience the summit for yourself, watch a recording of the event:

PDF icon 2018 Indigenous Connectivity Summit Community Report

This article was originally published on ILSR’s MuniNetworks.org. Read the original here.

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Hannah Trostle
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Hannah Trostle

Hannah Trostle was a Research Associate for ILSR's Community Broadband Networks Initiative. A graduate of Macalester College with a degree in Political Science, she works on issues of Internet access in rural communities. She's a member of the Cherokee Nation, but grew up among the lakes and woods of northern Minnesota.