Are Republican Governors Truly Representing Their Citizens on Health Care?

Date: 16 Apr 2012 | posted in: From the Desk of David Morris, The Public Good | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

A few days ago 26 states argued before the Supreme Court that the health law’s dramatic extension of Medicaid coverage constitutes unconstitutional federal coercion.  “Congress easily could have designed an act that encouraged rather than forced states to expand their … Read More

And the Winner is….The Public Sector

Date: 18 May 2011 | posted in: From the Desk of David Morris, The Public Good | 3 Facebooktwitterredditmail

“Unlike the public sector, the private sector is bred for efficiency. Left to its own devices, it will always find the means to provide services faster, cheaper, and more effectively than will governments,” said James Jay Carafano. I suspect the vast majority of Americans would agree with Mr. Carafano. They probably consider the statement self-evident. The facts, however, lead to the opposite conclusion. When not handicapped by regulations designed to subsidize the private sector, the public sector often provides services faster, cheaper and more effectively.… Read More

The State of the Union President Obama Should Have Given

Date: 26 Jan 2011 | posted in: From the Desk of David Morris, The Public Good | 5 Facebooktwitterredditmail

I started to write a comment on President Obama’s State of the Union Address, and the Republican Party’s responses. But I quickly realized the difficulties in having to comment on someone else’s narrative. I’d end up with, at best, a worthy critique when what I wanted was an alternative narrative. So I decided to write one. … Read More

How Canadians Built a Fair Health Care System from the Bottom Up

Date: 13 Dec 2010 | posted in: equity, From the Desk of David Morris, The Public Good | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

 The seeds of the current Canadian health system were sown in rural Saskatchewan in the early 20th century when small cities with no doctorsbegan to subsidize a physician to come and set up practice. Several communities then joined together to open publicly-funded hospitals.

In the 1930s, a new Canadian political party, whose name reflected its philosophy, the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), came to powerin Saskatchewan.

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