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Seattleites Want More Than Rhetoric in Quest for Better Broadband

| Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Apr 21, 2014 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at https://ilsr.org/seattleites-want-more-than-rhetoric-in-quest-for-better-broadband/

In a recent SLOG post from the Stranger, Ansel Herz commented on Mayor Ed Murray’s recent statement on broadband in Seattle. Murray’s statement included:

Finding a job, getting a competitive education, participating in our democracy, or even going to work for some, requires high speed internet access. I have seen people say online, “I don’t need a road to get to work, I need high speed internet.” Seattle would never leave the construction of roads up to a private monopoly, nor should we allow the City’s internet access to be constructed and managed by a private monopoly.

It is incredibly clear to me and residents throughout the City of Seattle, that the City’s current high speed internet options are not dependable enough, are cost prohibitive for many, and have few (if any) competitive options.

The Mayor also hinted that if the City needs a municipal broadband network, he would “help lead the way.”

As a Seattleite, Herz knows firsthand about the lack of connectivity options in the area. Herz writes:

This is both encouraging and disappointingly tentative language from the mayor. It seems to cast municipal broadband as a last resort. Municipal broadband is a no-f*cking-brainer. [our *]

Herz turned to Chris for perspective:

“I have seen this from many Mayors who talk about how someone should do something but we don’t always see concrete actions because of the difficulty and the immense opposition from some powerful companies like Comcast,” Christopher Mitchell, the Director of the Telecommunications as Commons Initiative, who’s worked with cities across the country on this question, tells me.

Seattle doesn’t know what to expect from a Mayor that Comcast tried to buy (we suspect they did not succeed but have nonetheless sent a loud message). It is encouraging to see that the issue has not simply disappeared, but Herz and his neighbors want more:

What are you waiting for, Ed? Progressive rhetoric (and retweeting people who want to see municipal broadband happen) is great, but commitment and action are even better.