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Featured Article filed under Broadband | Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Apr 9, 2015

Tale of Comcast Woe

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/tale-of-comcast-woe/

Ideally, working from home allows one to choose the environment where he or she can be most productive. In the case of Seth that was Kitsap County in Washington State. Unfortunately, incompetence on the part of Comcast, CenturyLink, and official broadband maps led Seth down a road of frustration that will ultimately require him to sell his house in order to work from home.

The Consumerist recently reported on Seth’s story, the details of which ring true to many readers who have ever dealt with the cable behemoth. This incident is another example of how the cable giant has managed to retain its spotless record as one of the most hated companies in America.

Seth, a software developer, provides a detailed timeline of his experience on his blog. In his intro:

Late last year we bought a house in Kitsap County, Washington — the first house I’ve ever owned, actually. I work remotely full time as a software developer, so my core concern was having good, solid, fast broadband available. In Kitsap County, that’s pretty much limited to Comcast, so finding a place with Comcast already installed was number one on our priority list.

We found just such a place. It met all of our criteria, and more. It had a lovely secluded view of trees, a nice kitchen, and a great home office with a separate entrance. After we called (twice!) to verify that Comcast was available, we made an offer.

The Consumerist correctly describes the next three months as “Kafkaesque.” Comcast Technicians appear with no notice, do not appear for scheduled appointments, and file mysteriously misplaced “tickets” and “requests.” When technicians did appear as scheduled, they are always surprised by what they saw: no connection to the house, no Comcast box on the dwelling, a home too far away from Comcast infrastructure to be hooked up. Every technician sent to work on the problem appeared with no notes or no prior knowledge of the situation.

It was the typical endless hamster wheel with cruel emotional torture thrown in for sport. At times customer service representatives Seth managed to reach over the phone would build up his hopes, telling him that his requests were in order, progress was being made behind the scenes, that it was only a matter of time before his Internet access was up and running. Then after a period of silence, Seth would call, and he would be told that whatever request he was waiting for was nonexistent, “timed out,” or in one instance had actually been completed.

Seth usually had to be the one to make the call to Comcast for follow up. There was one notable exception, however on February 26th:

Oh, this is fun. I got a call from a generic Comcast call center this morning asking me why I cancelled my latest installation appointment. Insult to injury, they started to up-sell me on all the great things I’d be missing out on if I didn’t reschedule! I just hung up.

In mid-March, Comcast discussed the possibility of building out its network to Seth’s house but he would have to pay for at least a portion of the costs; he was interested. Pre-survey estimates were up to $60,000. A week later, Comcast contacted Seth and told him that they would not do the extension even if Seth paid for the entire thing.

Comcast was not the only provider Seth contacted. When he first learned that Comcast did not connect his home, he contacted CenturyLink. He was told by a customer service tech he would be hooked up right away but the company called him the next day to tell him that CenturyLink would not be serving his needs. They were not adding new customers in his area.

Nevertheless, he was charged more than $100 for service he never could have received. Seth had to jump through hoops to get his “account” zeroed out. CenturyLink’s website showed that they DID serve Seth’s address, reports the Consumerist and, even though they have claimed to have updated the problem, the error remained as of March 23rd.

Official maps created by the state based on data supplied by providers, are grossly incorrect. As a result, Seth’s zip code is supposedly served by a number of providers. While that may be true on paper, it doesn’t do Seth much good. A number of those providers, including Comcast and CenturyLink (as Seth is painfully aware) do not serve his home. Satellite does not cannot the VPN connection he needs due to latency inherent in satellite Internet connections. He is using cellular wireless as a last resort now, but only as a short term solution because it is limited and expensive.

Ironically, Seth’s new home is not far from the Kitsap Public Utility District fiber network. Because state barriers require the Kitsap PUD to operate the network as a wholesale only model, however, Seth cannot hook up for high-speed Internet. He would only be able to connect if a provider chose to use the infrastructure to offer services to him.

Here we have the perfect storm of harmful state barriers, corporate gigantism, and “incumbetence.” From his blog:

I’m devastated. This means we have to sell the house. The house that I bought in December, and have lived in for only two months.

I don’t know where we go from here. I don’t know if there’s any kind of recourse. I do know that throughout this process, Comcast has lied. I don’t throw that word around lightly or flippantly, I mean it sincerely. They’ve fed me false information from the start, and it’s hurt me very badly.

This whole thing would have been avoided if only Comcast had said, right at the start, that they didn’t serve this address. Just that one thing would have made me strike this house off the list.

I don’t know exactly how much money I’m going to lose when I sell, but it’s going to be substantial. Three months of equity in a house isn’t a lot of money compared to sellers fees, excise taxes, and other moving expenses.

So, good bye dream house. You were the first house I ever owned, I’ll miss you.

But putting all the blame on Comcast ignores the failed public policy that allows Comcast to act like this. Providers like Comcast lobbied legislators and DC to ensure no map could be created that would be useful. The carriers have refused to turn over data at a granular level that would prevent these mistakes from happening. And whether it is the states, the NTIA, or the FCC, they have wasted hundreds of millions of dollars on maps that do little more than allow carriers to falsely claim there is no broadband problem in this country.

And we have utterly failed to hold our elected leaders to account for this corrupt system. Something needs to change – but it won’t until people stand up and demand an end to these stories.

 

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Featured Article, ILSR Press Room filed under Broadband | Written by Rebecca Toews | No Comments | Updated on Mar 13, 2015

Key Passages and Arguments From The FCC Decision to Remove Barriers to Municipal Networks in TN and NC

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/key-passages-fcc-local-authority-decision/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 13, 2015 CONTACT: Rebecca Toews, rebecca@ILSR.org, (612)808-0689   Key Passages and Arguments From The FCC Decision to Remove Barriers to Municipal Networks in TN and NC The Federal Communications Commission has released the order that allows Chattanooga and Wilson, as well as many other cities in North Carolina and Tennessee, to… Continue reading

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Featured Article filed under Broadband | Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Apr 20, 2015

Leverett Starts to Light Up in Massachusetts

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/leverett-starts-to-light-up-in-massachusetts/

The celebrated municipal network in Leverett, Massachusetts, is starting to serve select areas of the community. Customers’ properties on the north side of town are now receiving 1 gigabit Internet service from the town’s partner Crocker Communications. These early subscribers are considered “beta sites.” Telephone service will become available when the network has been fully… Continue reading

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Featured Article filed under Broadband | Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Mar 2, 2015

Blackburn and Tillis Introduce Bill Aimed to Undo FCC Decision to Restore Local Authority

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/blackburn-tillis-introduce-bill-aimed-undo-fcc-decision-restore-local-authority/

Last week, the FCC made history when it chose to restore local telecommunications authority by nullifying state barriers in Tennessee and North Carolina. Waiting in the wings were Rep. Marsha Blackburn and Senator Thom Tillis from Tennessee and North Carolina respectively, with their legislation to cut off the FCC at the knees. [A PDF of… Continue reading

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Featured Article filed under Broadband | Written by Rebecca Toews | No Comments | Updated on Apr 2, 2015

Freedom to Connect – Long Term Muni Strategies

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/freedom-to-connect-long-term-muni-strategies-3/

If you were not able to attend Freedom to Connect in New York on March 2 – 3, you can now view archived video of presentations from Chris and others. Now that the FCC has made a determination that may change the landscape of Internet access, it is time to consider the future of municipal… Continue reading