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Reading to Host New Small Scale Paper Mill

| Written by Neil Seldman | No Comments | Updated on Jun 5, 2012 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at https://ilsr.org/reading-pa-host-small-scale-paper-mill/

The City of Reading, PA, and Greys Paper Recycling Industries of Edmonton, Canada, have agreed that Reading will be the first city in the U.S. to host the company’s small scale, 40-ton-per-day paper mill. The facility will use 36 tons of high-grade paper per day, plus 4 tons of old cotton per day to make new paper and convert it into final products including stationery, copy paper, envelopes and folders.

ILSR is the city’s adviser on recycling and economic development.

At full scale the plant will employ 100 workers. Residents of Reading will be recruited for employment in the paper mill. Mayor Vaughn Spencer is traveling to Edmonton to view a Greys plant, which is expected to be fully operational in July 2012.

The Reading plant will take two years to build after permits are secured. Greys Paper Company will offer the only 100% recycled paper products available. All other recycled paper actually has a significant portion of virgin paper mixed with recycled paper. Greys’ business plan calls for marketing of all paper products within the Reading metropolitan area including to businesses, government agencies, universities and individual customers.

Greys Paper is planning to build many more small-scale plants in the U.S., according to the company president, Rajan Ahluwalia. The Greys plant in Edmonton is so unique that the city has invested $5 million in the plant and will benefit from future profits. Reading has had an opportunity to invest in the plant, and will benefit from future profits of Greys Paper Recycling Industries. The Company will encourage limited partnership investments from local businesses and individuals.

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About Neil Seldman

Neil Seldman, Ph.D., co-founded the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and is the Director of the Waste to Wealth Initiative. He specializes in helping cities and counties recover increasing amounts of materials from the waste stream and add value to the local economy  through new processing and manufacturing facilities.  Neil also serves on ILSR’s Board of Directors.

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