Energy efficiency has economies of scale

Date: 19 Nov 2009 | posted in: Energy, Energy Self Reliant States | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

The report [Synapse Energy Economics Inc.: Costs and Benefits of Electric Utility Energy Efficiency in Massachusetts] is worth reading in full, but this paragraph is absolutely vital:

Synapse recently undertook an extensive review of numerous utility and third party EE programs from across the United States in order to explore the empirical relationship between the cost of saved energy (CSE) per kWh saved and program scale in terms of first year energy savings as a percentage of annual energy sales. In the analysis, we found that the CSE tends to decrease as energy savings increase relative to annual energy sales. This finding is contrary to the idea of an energy efficiency supply curve that is often constructed to estimate economic potential of energy efficiency measures. These supply curves generally indicate that the CSE increases as energy savings increase, much like a generation supply curve would. In English: Energy efficiency gets cheaper the more you spend on it. [emphasis original]

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Report: Rural Power – Community-Scaled Renewable Energy and Rural Economic Development

Date: 5 Aug 2008 | posted in: agriculture, Energy, environment | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

This August 2008 report by David Morris and John Farrell was sponsored by the Ford Foundation. The next 20 years could generate as much as $1 trillion in new renewable energy investment in rural America. The report is a policy roadmap for states and the federal government that would redesignpolicies to encourage a highly decentralized and dispersed renewable energy industry that is significantly locally owned. Doing so would multiply the number of rural areas that benefit from burgeoning renewable energy industries, and would create a sustainable asset whose wealth and revenue will largely remain in revived local communities and regions.

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New Study Proposes Powerful Strategy to Expand Renewable Energy and Boost Local Economies

Date: 17 Jan 2008 | posted in: Energy, Energy Self Reliant States | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

Several European countries and the Canadian province of Ontario have recently adopted feed-in tariffs, a mandated, long-term premium price for renewable energy paid by the local utility company to renewable energy producers. A new study by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) shows how feed-in tariffs could turbocharge Minnesota’s renewable electricity standard, reduce costs, and spread the economic benefits across the state.

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New Study Proposes Powerful Strategy To Expand Renewable Energy and Boost Local Economies

Date: 17 Jan 2008 | posted in: Energy, Press Release | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

For Immediate Release PRESS RELEASE CONTACT: 612-276-3456 NEW STUDY PROPOSES POWERFUL STRATEGY TO EXPAND RENEWABLE ENERGY AND BOOST LOCAL ECONOMIES https://ilsr.org/wp-content/uploads/files/images/feed-in-tariffs.pdfMinneapolis, Minn.– (January 17, 2008). Several European countries and the Canadian province of Ontario have recently adopted feed-in tariffs, a … Read More

Report: Wind and Ethanol: Economies and Diseconomies of Scale

Date: 7 Aug 2007 | posted in: Energy, Energy Self Reliant States | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

Congress and most state legislatures have or are developing renewable energy policies with a single objective: get more renewables. Our new study, Wind and Ethanol: Economies and Diseconomies of Scale, finds that this single minded focus ignores the potential economic benefits from locally owned and more modestly scaled facilities. The focus should on better renewable energy projects not simply more.

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Report: Wind and Ethanol – Economies and Diseconomies of Scale

Date: 5 Jul 2007 | posted in: Energy | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

This July 2007 report by John Farrell finds that there are indeed small cost reductions from very large scale, absentee owned renewable energy facilities. But that these are overshadowed by the significant loss in potential economic benefits from locally owned and more modestly scaled facilities. The study finds that these transportation-related costs may offset a large part of the reduced production costs from large wind farms and ethanol plants.… Read More

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