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| Written by ILSR | No Comments | Updated on Jun 11, 2015 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at

Last summer the community of Brentwood began working with in a plan to use publicly owned conduit for a privately owned fiber network. Earlier this month, the partners celebrated completion of part of that network and officially lit-up the first residential neighborhood served by’s fiber gigabit service.

The Mercury News reports that residents are much happier with the new Internet service provider than they were with incumbents Comcast and AT&T:

“I had no lag, no buffering, no waiting — it almost feels like the Internet’s waiting on you, rather than you waiting for the Internet,” said Brentwood resident Matt Gamblin, who was one of the first residents to sign up for the service. “The hardest part about the process was canceling my old Internet.”

Brentwood began installing conduit as a regular practice in 1999; the community adopted the policy as a local ordinance, requiring new developers to install it in all new construction. The city has experienced significant growth and the conduit has grown to over 150 miles, reaching over 8,000 homes and a large segment of Brentwood’s commercial property. As a result, they have incrementally developed an extensive network of fiber ready conduit. 

As part of their agreement with, Brentwood will save an estimated $15,000 per year in connectivity fees because the ISP will provide gigabit service at no charge for City Hall. will fill in gaps in the conduit where they interfere with network routes. In school jurisdictions where 30 percent or more of households subscribe, public schools will also get free Internet access. (We have grave concerns about the impact of only extending high quality Internet access to schools where households are better able to subscribe to Internet access at any price point.)

City officials hope to draw more of San Francisco’s high tech workforce to town. Over the past two decades of population growth, the city has prospered but community leaders want to diversify:

Officials don’t expect the population growth to stop anytime soon, but they also don’t want to rely too heavily on property tax revenues and risk having budgetary shortfalls during a housing crisis, such as what happened to Antioch in recent years. They’re hoping things like this new high-speed Internet will attract more tech workers to town, and city leaders will be working this year to see if Brentwood can truly become an epicenter for business.

“That’s the basic question: Are we a bedroom community or are we something else?” City Manager Gus Vina said. “And that ‘something else’ needs to have that balanced economy — diversification is the key.”

This article is apart of MuniNetworks. The original piece can be found here