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Roosevelt Institute Argues for Better Broadband Policy – Community Broadband Bits Podcast 258

| Written by Christopher | No Comments | Updated on Jun 13, 2017 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at https://ilsr.org/roosevelt-institute-argues-for-better-broadband-policy-community-broadband-bits-podcast-258/

This is episode 258 of our Community Broadband Bits podcast! Community Broadband Bits is a short weekly audio show featuring interviews with people building community networks or otherwise involved with Internet policy.

As the telecommunications and broadband market has become more and more consolidated, it has drawn more attention, leading to more attention from people that actually care about functioning markets. Enter the Roosevelt Institute and their report, Crossed Lines: Why the AT&T-Time Warner Merger Demands a New Approach to Antitrust.

Roosevelt Institute Senior Economist and Fellow Marshall Steinbaum and Program Director Rakeen Mabud join us to talk about the failing broadband market and what can be done at both the federal and local levels.

Marshall focuses more on the federal level and antitrust while Rakeen discusses local solutions that local governments can implement. We talk about the FCC, the FTC, the history and future of competition in telecommunications, and how local governments can make sure low-income Internet access projects stay funded in the long term.

We want your feedback and suggestions for the show-please e-mail us or leave a comment below.

This show is 31 minutes long and can be played on this page or via iTunes or the tool of your choice using this feed.

You can download this mp3 file directly from here. Listen to other episodes here or view all episodes in our index.

 

This article was originally published on ILSR’s MuniNetworks.org. Read the original here.

Thanks to Arne Huseby for the music. The song is Warm Duck Shuffle and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license.