Listen: How Epic Games’ Acquisition of Bandcamp will Impact Independent Artists

Date: 10 Mar 2022 | posted in: Retail | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

Senior Researcher and Writer Ron Knox was featured on The Grapevine, a talk radio show on RRR Radio in Melbourne, Australia, where he discussed Epic Games’ recent acquisition of Bandcamp and its effect on independent artists. 

For years Bandcamp has been celebrated as an artist-first platform that allows anyone selling music and merchandise to set their own prices for their products. Ron explains, “Bandcamp functions as the best possible online and digital version of an old school brick-and-mortar record store.” Since its founding, Bandcamp has encouraged music fans to support independent artists and labels by buying their music directly from them, rather than relying on the predatory streaming models of Spotify, YouTube, and other services.

Ron believes that Epic could change Bandcamp’s business model after the acquisition. “The acquired company rarely maintains its true independence in the form that it was in before the acquisition.” As with many other mergers that move a truly independent company to the control of a much larger corporate parent, he fears that the acquisition will “undermine the entire idea behind Bandcamp, the reason why independent musicians and labels flock to it.”

Listen to the radio show here.


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Follow Luke Gannon:
Luke Gannon

Luke recently received a BA in journalism, creative writing, and ethnography from Hampshire College. She wrote, designed, and edited a magazine titled The Politics of Land in Teton Valley, ID that analyzed the environmental, economic, and social patterns of the region amidst Covid-19.

Follow Ron Knox:
Ron Knox

Senior Researcher

Ron Knox is the senior researcher and writer for the Independent Business Initiative. He has studied and written about antitrust and monopoly power for more than a decade. Before joining ILSR, he worked in various senior editorial roles at Global Competition Review, and his antimonopoly writing has appeared in The Washington Post, Slate, The American Prospect and elsewhere. He is based in Kansas City.