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Governing Looks at What the Comcast – Time Warner Cable Merger Could Do to Munis

| Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on May 21, 2014 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at https://ilsr.org/governing-looks-at-what-the-comcast-time-warner-cable-merger-could-do-to-munis/

The debate surrounding the proposed Comcast Time Warner Cable merger continues. The Department of Justice and the FCC ruminate over the deal while the media speculates about the future.

Governing recently published an article on potential side effects for the municipal network movement. Tod Newcombe reached out to Chris for expert opinion.

From Governing:

Partially thanks to Comcast and other cable giant’s lobbying, 19 states have already passed laws that ban or restrict local communities from setting up publicly owned alternatives to the dominant provider in the area. Municipalities that pursue publicly owned broadband often cite several reasons for their efforts, ranging from lack of competition and choices in the area to a desire for faster speeds at lower costs. But Mitchell fears the lobbying power of a combined Comcast-Time Warner would choke off what little leverage remains for local governments when it comes to gaining state approval to build publicly owned broadband networks.

Unfortunately, the cable company cyclops borne out of this deal would create a ginormous lobbying monster. Comcast and Time Warner Cable wield significant political influence separately; a marriage of the two would likely damage the municipal network movement. The Center for Responsive Politics reports Comcast spent over $18 million in 2013; Time Warner Cable spent over $8 million.

Chris told Governing:

“Judging by the amount of opposition to the merger, I think people are seeing that we’re at a tipping point and that there are ways they can make investments at the local level and control their own destiny,” said Mitchell. “A lot of people and local businesses understand that the Internet is really important and that we can’t trust it to a few corporations. But I don’t see that level of understanding from most elected officials yet.”