Financial System Even More Vulnerable Now, Warns Inspector General

Financial System Even More Vulnerable Now, Warns Inspector General

Date: 2 Feb 2010 | posted in: Banking | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

The latest report from TARP Inspector General Neil Barofsky contains a strong warning that we will see a repeat of the financial crisis unless lawmakers enact substantial policy reform:

“The substantial costs of TARP — in money, moral hazard effects on the market, and Government credibility — will have been for naught if we do nothing to correct the fundamental problems in our financial system and end up in a similar or even greater crisis in two, or five, or ten years’ time.  It is hard to see how any of the fundamental problems in the system have been addressed to date.

  • “To the extent that huge, interconnected, “too big to fail” institutions contributed to the crisis, those institutions are now even larger, in part because of the substantial subsidies provided by TARP and other bailout programs.
  • “To the extent that institutions were previously incentivized to take reckless risks through a “heads, I win; tails, the Government will bail me out” mentality, the market is more convinced than ever that the Government will step in as necessary to save systemically significant institutions.
  • “To the extent that large institutions’ risky behavior resulted from the desire to justify ever-greater bonuses … there has been little fundamental change in the excessive compensation culture on Wall Street.
  •   “To the extent that the crisis was fueled by a “bubble” in the housing market, the Federal Government’s concerted efforts to support home prices … risk re-inflating that bubble.

“Stated another way, even if TARP saved our financial system from driving off a cliff back in 2008, absent meaningful reform, we are still driving on the same winding mountain road, but this time in a faster car.”

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Stacy Mitchell

Stacy Mitchell is co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, and directs its Independent Business Initiative, which partners with a wide range of allies to implement policies that counter concentrated power and strengthen local economies.