Energy Democracy Media Roundup – Week of February 19, 2018

Energy Democracy Media Roundup – Week of February 19, 2018

Date: 22 Feb 2018 | posted in: Energy | 0 Facebooktwitterredditmail

This week in Energy Democracy news:

In Indiana, the wind down of net metering rules means that customers are scrambling for installation; a Kentucky anti-solar bill gains traction, and critics; this Michigan group is pushing a ballot initiative that will get the state to 30% renewable energy soon; and Virginia Democrats deal utility monopoly Dominion a harsh blow in flexing their monopolistic muscle in the state legislature.

 

Featured Stories:

In Indiana, solar program assists with flurry of year-end installations by Kari Lydersen, Energy News Network

A state law passed last year phases out net metering, and only solar installed by Dec. 31, 2017, was grandfathered in to receive retail rates for energy sent back to the grid through 2047. Anyone who missed the deadline by even a day can only net meter until 2032.

So despite frigid and snowy weather, Burkholder and his employees worked hard — some skipping family vacations — to install as many systems as possible before the end of the year.

“They shoveled the snow off our roof and went right to work, with the temperature around 10 degrees, the windchill zero degrees. It was impressive,” said Joshua Weaver, a Goshen, Indiana, high school math and social studies teacher whose installation was done by Solar Energy Systems on Dec. 30.

Can Puerto Rico Overcome A Colonial Past To Build A Greener Grid? By John Farrell, CleanTechnica

House solar bill undermines entrepreneurship, benefits monopolies by Matt PartyMiller, Lexington Herald-Coureir

In recent media coverage of House Bill 227, we have been told that, from a utility perspective, proposed legislation before the Kentucky General Assembly does not end net-metering as we know it.

“Alternative facts” are not useful in setting public policy and tend to foster division, particularly when this is not a partisan issue.

Under current law, private solar generators receive a credit at the retail rate for any excess solar power they generate and send to the electric grid — a credit that under current legislation can never be cashed in but only used at a later date by the system owner.

Under HB 227, that rate changes to only a few cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The difference? Roughly a 70 percent decrease in credit for most ratepayers that will most certainly end net metering in Kentucky.

Boulder Voters Say (Again): “We’ll Lead Movement To Energy Democracy” by John Farrell, CleanTechnica

Massachusetts Reaches Significant Solar Milestone by Betsy Lillian, Solar Industry Magazine

“With over 2,000 megawatts of solar now installed, Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in solar deployment and clean energy innovation,” says Gov. Charlie Baker. “Through our next solar incentive program, SMART, and our forward-thinking solar grant programs, we look forward to doubling that amount of solar and building a sustainable and affordable clean energy future for the commonwealth.”

Massachusetts has ranked second in the U.S. for total solar jobs for the last two years and ranks sixth in the nation for new installed solar capacity.

Paying Utilities For Performance by John Farrell, CleanTechnica

Renewable energy group launches Mich. ballot campaign by Jonathan Oosting, Detroit News

Michigan electric providers would be required to produce at least 30 percent of their energy from renewable sources by 2030 under a potential ballot proposal organizers hope to put before voters this fall.

A group called Clean Energy, Healthy Michigan is preparing to launch a petition drive this week for a statutory initiative designed to increase development of solar, wind and other renewable energy sources.

Local Energy Rules: Electric Vehicles Unlock Local Energy Benefits, Deliver Cost Savings by John Farrell, CleanTechnica

Elections Still Matter: Virginia Democrats stun state energy monopoly in late-night rejection by David Dayen, The Intercept

Dominion Energy, the utility monopoly in Virginia, suffered a rare loss on the floor of the state House of Delegates late Monday night, when their ability to double-charge ratepayers for infrastructure improvements was stripped out of a controversial bill.

The bill, which sailed through the Senate and is expected to pass the House of Delegates on Tuesday, would let Dominion and other utilities in the state use excess profits to pay for the upgrades, like modernization of the energy grid or renewable generation. Because Dominion could also use those upgrades as a rationale to increase its base power rates, critics charged that utilities could get ratepayers to pay twice for the same infrastructure. Virginia’s State Corporation Commission and the state Office of the Attorney General agreed.

Senate populists tried to put a restriction on the double-dipping in their version of the bill, but lost. But the House of Delegates, with all 49 Democrats joining six Republicans, were successful in passing such an amendment in the 100-member chamber.

 

Energy Democracy News Across the States:

Arizona

APS, First Solar plan large West Valley solar power plant with giant battery by Ryan Randazzo, Arizona Republic

 

California

Why are big utilities so afraid? by Linda Parks and Sheila Kuehl, Sacramento Bee

Last year, Ventura and Los Angeles counties took a huge step forward in creating energy choices when we joined with dozens of local cities to create the Clean Power Alliance of Southern California. Since, 28 jurisdictions have signed on to offer cleaner, greener and cheaper energy to communities throughout Southern California. We are not the first local California governments to embrace the promise of what is known as community choice aggregation.

Could electric vehicles become as common as smart phones? by F. Noel Perry and Adam J. Fowler, Sacramento Bee

Palo Alto Utilities tries to keep pace with technological change by Gennady Sheyner, Palo Alto Online

 

Connecticut

Connecticut wants to boost renewables goal to 40% by 2030 by Robert Walton, Utility Dive

The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has finalized the state’s 2018 Comprehensive Energy Strategy (CES), and recommended doubling the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) to 40% by 2030.

The new renewables goal is a significant step up and higher than previously considered. State law currently sets the RPS at 20%, and the draft CES released last year had suggested a smaller increase to 30%.

Solar is again the flashpoint in CT’s new energy strategy by Jan Ellen Spiegel

Connecticut lawmaker calls for restoration of energy efficiency funds by Luther Turmelle, New Haven Register

 

Hawaii

Digging Into Hawaii’s New Demand Response Regime by Jeff St. John, Greentech Media

 

Idaho

Idaho Public Utilities Commission schedules hearings on net metering proposal by Kevin Randolph, Daily Energy Insider

 

Illinois

Church becomes 1st in southern Illinois with solar panels by Logan Gay, WPSD-6

Knox County has plans for solar energy by Rebecca Susmarski, Galesburg Register-Mail

Lacon looking at ‘solar community garden’ by Gary L. Smith, Peoria Journal Star

 

Iowa

Report Examines ‘Rural Perspectives’ On Iowa Renewable Energy by Joseph Bebon, North American Wind Power

Iowa energy bills receive mixed reviews by Mitchell Schmidt, Cedar Rapids Gazette

Muscatine farmer sees solar as a smart investment by Zachary Oren Smith, Muscatine Journal

 

Indiana

In Indiana, solar program assists with flurry of year-end installations by Kari Lydersen, Energy News Network

A state law passed last year phases out net metering, and only solar installed by Dec. 31, 2017, was grandfathered in to receive retail rates for energy sent back to the grid through 2047. Anyone who missed the deadline by even a day can only net meter until 2032.

So despite frigid and snowy weather, Burkholder and his employees worked hard — some skipping family vacations — to install as many systems as possible before the end of the year.

“They shoveled the snow off our roof and went right to work, with the temperature around 10 degrees, the windchill zero degrees. It was impressive,” said Joshua Weaver, a Goshen, Indiana, high school math and social studies teacher whose installation was done by Solar Energy Systems on Dec. 30.

 

Kansas

Kansas clean energy backers see chance for progress instead of defense by Karen Uhlenhuth, Midwest Energy News

Westar Battling Solar Advocates On Who Should Subsidize Whom In Kansas by Brian Grimmett, KCUR

 

Kentucky

Rep. Wayne slams ‘insidious malignancy’ in effort to pass Kentucky anti-solar bill by James Bruggers, Lexington Courier-Journal

But the bill itself wasn’t his point, Wayne told his fellow lawmakers. Earlier this week he called the move to add three members mid-session to the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee “part of an insidious malignancy that can infect a democracy.”

Sometimes called the conscience of the Kentucky General Assembly, Wayne took the House floor to say that “this is the people’s body. We must be respectful of the people that we represent, all the citizens of the Commonwealth. The rules are set, we follow the rules, we follow the established committee system.

“To change the system midstream which could, in turn, tilt votes in a certain direction is not right.”

Ky. Legislature looks at cutting net metering for solar by Ronnie Ellis, Daily Independent

Kentucky Committee Passes Controversial Net Metering Bill by Ryland Barton, WFPL

The Kentucky House Natural Resources Committee has advanced a controversial bill that would scale back Kentucky’s solar net metering program, making it eligible for a vote from the full Kentucky House of Representatives.

About 1,000 households in Kentucky with rooftop solar panels put extra energy back onto the power grid through Kentucky’s net metering program.

Using tomatoes to attack solar power, a Kentucky lawmaker pulls from big business playbook by James Bruggers, Louisville Courier-Journal

House solar bill undermines entrepreneurship, benefits monopolies by Matt PartyMiller, Lexington Herald-Coureir

In recent media coverage of House Bill 227, we have been told that, from a utility perspective, proposed legislation before the Kentucky General Assembly does not end net-metering as we know it.

“Alternative facts” are not useful in setting public policy and tend to foster division, particularly when this is not a partisan issue.

Under current law, private solar generators receive a credit at the retail rate for any excess solar power they generate and send to the electric grid — a credit that under current legislation can never be cashed in but only used at a later date by the system owner.

Under HB 227, that rate changes to only a few cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The difference? Roughly a 70 percent decrease in credit for most ratepayers that will most certainly end net metering in Kentucky.

 

Maine

Owners of hybrids, all-electric vehicles fume over proposal to assess annual fee by Peter McGuire, Portland Press Herald

Owners of Wayne solar farm challenge property taxes in potential landmark case by Charles Eichacker, Central Maine

 

Maryland

Maryland first state to offer energy storage tax credit by Samantha Hogan, Frederick News Post

Maryland bill calls for 14.5% solar by 2028 by Frank Andorka, PV Magazine

A pair of bills introduced this week – Senate Bill (SB) 732 and House Bill (HB) 1453 – would double the state’s renewable energy ambition by requiring that utilities procure 50% of their electricity from renewables by 2030, a major increase on the current mandate of 25% by 2020. This includes a significant increase in the solar carve-out, from 2.5% to 5.5% next year and rising to 14.5% by 2028.

Maryland county introduces legislation to allow 2-MW community solar projects by Kelly Pickerel, Solar Power World Online

 

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Reaches Significant Solar Milestone by Betsy Lillian, Solar Industry Magazine

“With over 2,000 megawatts of solar now installed, Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in solar deployment and clean energy innovation,” says Gov. Charlie Baker. “Through our next solar incentive program, SMART, and our forward-thinking solar grant programs, we look forward to doubling that amount of solar and building a sustainable and affordable clean energy future for the commonwealth.”

Massachusetts has ranked second in the U.S. for total solar jobs for the last two years and ranks sixth in the nation for new installed solar capacity.

Senate committee advances ambitious Massachusetts clean energy bill, ‘matching the urgency of climate change’ by Shira Schoenberg, MassLive

Is clean energy moving ahead fast enough in Western Massachusetts? by Mary C. Serreze, MassLive

Newburyport extends Solarize Plus program by Jojo Clemens, Wicked Local

Massachusetts bill to supercharge clean energy goals by Christian Roselund, PV Magazine

 

Michigan

New “smart neighborhood” planned for Highland Park by Catherine Shaffer, Michigan Radio

Renewable energy group launches Mich. ballot campaign by Jonathan Oosting, Detroit News

Michigan electric providers would be required to produce at least 30 percent of their energy from renewable sources by 2030 under a potential ballot proposal organizers hope to put before voters this fall.

A group called Clean Energy, Healthy Michigan is preparing to launch a petition drive this week for a statutory initiative designed to increase development of solar, wind and other renewable energy sources.

Hundreds attend informational meeting regarding solar farm plan by Jef Rietsma, Sturgis Journal

Michigan’s utilities have a history of trying to block renewable energy increases like the one that could be on the ballot in November by Matt Kasper, Energy & Policy Institute

Michigan group starts ballot campaign for 30% by 30 renewable energy by Frank Andorka, PV Magazine

Michigan utilities making progress on developing electric vehicle programs by Andy Balaskovitz, Energy News Network

 

Minnesota

Minnesota solar energy employment up almost 50 percent in 2017 by Mike Hughlett, Minneapolis Star Tribune

Nationwide, U.S. solar energy industry employment fell by 4 percent or 9,800 jobs, according to a report released Wednesday by The Solar Foundation. It was the first decline since The Solar Foundation began tracking jobs in 2010.

Total U.S. solar employment was 250,271 last year, with the majority of those jobs in installation.

In Minnesota last year, solar employment grew 48 percent, hitting 4,256 jobs, according to The Solar Foundation. Only Delaware had a larger growth rate: 51 percent. “Minnesota was one of our brightest states in 2017,” said Avery Palmer, a spokesman for The Solar Foundation.

Reader’s View: Solar is hot, deserves support on Iron Range by Jean Farrell, Duluth News Tribune

Our View: Programs help advance city’s clean-energy goal by Rochester Post Bulletin Editorial Board

Solar array makes dream a reality by Kitty Mayo, Duluth Business North

NextEra Energy Resources adds to Minnesota community solar boom by Frank Andorka, PV Magazine

As of November, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, Minnesota’s community solar program had more than 100 projects totaling 170 MW of capacity.

“Minnesota’s program is the best in the country,” Farrell wrote in a blog piece touting the program in November . “There 10 times more community solar projects in the queue — 400 MW — in Minnesota than have been built in the history of community solar in the United States (outside Minnesota).”

 

Missouri

Columbia goes beyond renewable energy goals by Andrew Douglas, Columbia Missourian

St. Louis to test drive free electric cab service downtown by Bryce Gray, St. Louis Today

 

Nebraska

OPPD community solar project could allow for 100 percent renewables, in theory by Cole Epley, Omaha World-Herald

 

New Hamsphire

Concord City Council discusses greener goals for the city’s energy by Caitlin Andrews, Concord Monitor

They were supporting the Ready for 100% Renewable Energy Campaign, a goal-driven initiative coming out of Concord’s Energy and Environment Committee that would strive to have the city operating on 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.

It’s a goal that’s been acknowledged as ambitious by Ward 5 Councilor Rob Werner, who chairs the committee, since the campaign kicked off in October. And while how the city would get to that goal is still conceptual at this point, the night’s discussion focused on whether adopting the plan would have immediate impacts.

The State of Solar Power in New Hampshire by Lynne Snierson, New Hampshire Magazine

 

New Jersey

National energy company to build arrays on old Somerset landfill by Michael Holtzman, New Jersey Herald News

Op-Ed: Support homegrown solar energy this session by Anne Hoskins, New Jersey Spotlight

 

New Mexico

New Mexico Senate seeks income tax credit for rooftop solar by Associated Press

 

New York

Hochul announces NY’s solar power usage “up 1000 percent” since 2011 by Michael Mroziak, WBFO – Buffalo Public Radio

New York could be headed for the country’s most ambitious energy storage goal by Peter Maloney, Utility Dive

New York State could be on its way to crafting the most aggressive energy storage goal in the country.

The target is still a work in progress, but based on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s (D) recent announcement and interviews with analysts, it could be set above 1,500 MW by 2030.

“I think the target would be higher than 1,500 MW,” Conor Bambrick, air and energy director at Environmental Advocates of New York, told Utility Dive.

California’s energy storage target is 1,300 MW by 2020. In his state of the state address in early January, Cuomo set a target of 1,500 MW by 2025. But 2030 is the target year that will be established by New York’s current energy storage bill, to keep it on the same track as the state’s 50% renewables goal in its Clean Energy Standard.

NYPA to Re-Think Albany Microgrid Following Pressure to Add Renewables by Elisa Wood, Microgrid Knowledge

Under pressure from local advocates, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) says it will take a second look at plans for a 16-MW Albany microgrid project to see if it can incorporate renewable energy.

As originally conceived the Albany microgrid would use combined heat and power (CHP) to supply 90 percent of the power, as well as heating and cooling, for the 10 buildings at Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza.

 

Puerto Rico

A Ray Of Sunshine Falls On Puerto Rico by James Conca, Forbes

Privatizing Puerto Rico’s energy utility could be Whitefish 2.0 by Ramon Luis Nieves, The Hill

Hurricane María was a total catastrophe for the people of Puerto Rico. But “Hurricane PREPA”, a man-made disaster, left 3.4 million American citizens without power, and without hope. The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and the government of Puerto Rico are not just financially broke — their credibility is also long gone.

The notorious, and self-inflicted, Whitefish debacle destroyed the credibility of the government of Puerto Rico. After Maria made landfall, PREPA failed to activate existing “mutual aid agreements” with other public and investor-owned electric companies. Instead, they opted to sign a shady $300 million contract with Whitefish, an unknown, two employee company from Montana.

Grid Defection Is On the Rise in Puerto Rico by Emma Foehringer Merchant, Greentech Media

 

South Carolina

Q&A: In South Carolina, a conservative case for solar by Jim Pierobon, Southeast Energy News

SCANA, Dominion seek quick OK from S.C. on sale but want to stall slashing customer payments by Andrew Brown, Charleston Post and Courier

 

Utah

Utah lawmakers approve rooftop solar compromise bill by Amy Joi O’Donoghue, Deseret News

A bill to puts into law a complicated compromise eked out among the solar industry, clean energy advocates and Rocky Mountain Power on rooftop solar tax credits cleared a legislative committee Wednesday.

Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo, is sponsoring SB141 to institutionalize what he described as a “grand compromise” among the players in an intense and protracted battle shaping the destiny of rooftop solar systems in Utah.

Rocky Mountain Power helping to restore Utah tax breaks on solar panels, but is the utility just looking out for itself? by Emma Penrod, Salt Lake Tribune

Continuing Utah’s stewardship legacy by Logan Christian, The Herald Journal

 

Vermont

New solar site proposed for Transportation Center by Chris Mays, Brattleboro Reformer

Vermont’s solar market fell 50% in 2017 (w/chart) by Christian Roselund, PV Magazine

Vermont solar job losses tied to net metering changes by Dave Gram, Vermont Digger

Legislation passed in 2014, implemented in rules that took effect in 2016, reduced slightly the rates utilities are required to pay for power from customers who have installed solar-electric systems and are sending power back to the grid.

The result of that and other rules changes was that “Vermont saw its first-ever decline in customer solar installations,” Renewable Energy Vermont said. “Community solar” projects, in which customers with unsuitable home sites chip in to support solar installations elsewhere, saw the biggest decline, the industry group said.

 

Virginia

Majority of Democrats running for Congress in Va. pledge not to take money from Dominion, ApCo by Patrick Wilson, Richmond Times-Dispatch

A majority of Democrats running for Congress this year in Virginia — 21 as of Tuesday — have agreed to a pledge not to take campaign money from Dominion Energy or Appalachian Power Co.

In addition, six other Democratic candidates have publicly pledged not to take money from Dominion or not to take corporate PAC money, according to Activate Virginia, the group that coordinated the pledge.

It coincides with a national effort to persuade politicians to stop taking money from the fossil fuel industry. Last year, two candidates for lieutenant governor and 74 candidates for House of Delegates took the pledge, 13 of whom were elected.

Virginia gov announces compromise on electric rate overhaul by Alan Suderman, Associated Press

Virginia Senate passes utility regulation overhaul by Robert Zullo, Richmond Times-Dispatch

The far-reaching legislation shifts Virginia to what Dominion calls a “reinvestment model” that lets the company keep millions in earnings that would otherwise be returned to customers in exchange for investments in grid upgrades and renewable energy, among other spending, over the next decade.

Supporters bill it as a way to transform the state’s electrical grid to match a shift in the utility industry that better incorporates solar, wind and battery storage and hardens the system against storms and cyberattacks. The legislation has a host of bells and whistles, including a push for expensive programs to put distribution and transmission lines underground, $200 million in credits for Dominion customers for past overpayments, and about $1 billion in energy efficiency investments.

Elections Still Matter: Virginia Democrats stun state energy monopoly in late-night rejection by David Dayen, The Intercept

Dominion Energy, the utility monopoly in Virginia, suffered a rare loss on the floor of the state House of Delegates late Monday night, when their ability to double-charge ratepayers for infrastructure improvements was stripped out of a controversial bill.

The bill, which sailed through the Senate and is expected to pass the House of Delegates on Tuesday, would let Dominion and other utilities in the state use excess profits to pay for the upgrades, like modernization of the energy grid or renewable generation. Because Dominion could also use those upgrades as a rationale to increase its base power rates, critics charged that utilities could get ratepayers to pay twice for the same infrastructure. Virginia’s State Corporation Commission and the state Office of the Attorney General agreed.

Senate populists tried to put a restriction on the double-dipping in their version of the bill, but lost. But the House of Delegates, with all 49 Democrats joining six Republicans, were successful in passing such an amendment in the 100-member chamber.

Virginia Democrats Score A Surprising Win Against Powerful Utility Monopoly by Daniel Marans, Huffington Post

 

Wisconsin

Fort backs countywide solar group purchase by Ryan Whisner, Daily Jefferson County Union

Heart of the City and Sustain Jefferson, nonprofit community service groups that encourage sustainable development, are working with Midwest Renewable Energy Association to organize a solar group buy in and around Jefferson County called Glacial Heritage Solar between January and August 2018.

A solar group buy enables interested residential and commercial consumers in a designated geographic area to access volume discounts through choosing to purchase solar electric systems during the designated period of time. The more participants, the lower the cost of power will be for everyone.

At the table: Communities and utilities working together by Bill Bailey, Ashland Daily Press

What’s the Wind Turbine South of Downtown Milwaukee Powering? by Susan Bence, WUWM – Milwaukee Public Radio

 

Nationwide Energy Democracy News:

Microgrids have a big role to play in the energy sector: Here’s why by Anmar Frangoul, CNBC

Natural Gas Industry Admits New Pipelines Aren’t Needed by Amy Mall, National Resource Defense Council

How leading utilities are planning for distributed energy resources by Herman K. Trabish, Utility Dive

For many U.S. utilities, the threat is real and growing. Between 2018 and 2022, U.S. distributed solar installations will grow from today’s roughly 2.0 million to almost 3.8 million, according to GTM Research. Behind-the-meter battery storage is forecast to grow in that period from around 200 MW to nearly 1,400 MW. And EVs will go from today’s 1% of new car sales to over 50% by 2035, Energy Innovation reckons.

Few utilities are seeing DER penetrations today that threaten reliability or revenues. But most are beginning to prepare, entering regulatory discussions about grid modernization, DER compensation and other associated issues. Even Duke Energy, which has relatively low DER penetrations today, is planning for its future growth.

Utilities must ensure innovative grid technologies leave no customer behind by Richard Caperton and Robin Lunt, Utility Dive

The ‘small miracle’ that may lead to California’s net metering successor by Herman K. Trabish, Utility Dive

When — and Where — Will Electric Vehicles Rule the Roads? by Bob Graves, Governing

The undisputed leader is Norway, where fully 35 percent of new vehicles sold in 2017 — and 52 percent of those sold in December alone — were EVs.

Looking at Norway’s figures, one might believe that EVs are on a fast track to upend the century-long reign of fossil fuels as the dominant vehicular power source. That may very well be the case in Norway, where almost all electricity is generated from hydropower, EVs are exempted from most taxes, and their owners enjoy a range of benefits that can be worth thousands of dollars a year, including free recharging and use of toll roads along with free or subsidized parking. But what about the rest of the world? Experts’ predictions are truly all over the map.

Trump’s Proposed Budget Slashes Funding for Clean Energy Programs by Emma Foehringer Merchant, Greentech Media

A Powerful Mix of Solar and Batteries Is Beating Natural Gas by Chris Martin & Mark Chediak, Bloomberg

At NARUC, three actions to support the grid of the future by Anne Hoskins Abigail Hopper, Tom Starrs, Thomas Plagemann, and Sachu Constantine; Utility Dive

How laying down on the job can help solar installers cut costs by Frank Jossi, Energy News Network

EIA: Hawaii electricity prices are highest, but South Carolinians spend the most by Peter Maloney, Utility Dive

It has often been said the best conservation method is high prices. On Tuesday, the EIA published an article that would seem to bolster that argument, at least in part.

While states such as Hawaii, Alaska and Connecticut lead the nation in residential electricity prices, South Carolina, Alabama and Maryland were in the top tier in terms of residential expenditures per customer, due to high electricity usage. Connecticut has the distinction of being third in terms of both electricity prices (20 cents/kWh) and expenditures.

The average residential electricity customer in South Carolina spent $1,753 for electricity in 2016. Annual household expenditures in Alabama, Connecticut and Maryland were $1,747, $1,706 and $1,698, respectively.

US Renewable Energy Generation Now ‘Within Striking Distance’ of Nuclear by Emma Foehringer Merchant, Greentech Media

2018 Solar Power Rocks Report Grades Ev by Steve Hanley, CleanTechnica

This post originally published at ilsr.org. Follow the Institute for Local Self-Reliance on Twitter and Facebook and sign-up for ILSR’s newsletters.

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Nick Stumo-Langer
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Nick Stumo-Langer

Nick Stumo-Langer is Communications Manager at ILSR working for all five initiatives. He runs ILSR's Facebook and Twitter profiles and builds relationships with reporters. He is an alumnus of St. Olaf College and animated by the concerns of monopoly power across our economy.