Back to top Jump to featured resources
Article filed under Broadband

Crain’s New York Business: New York City Conduit Jam Packed

| Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Apr 15, 2014 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at https://ilsr.org/crains-new-york-business-new-york-city-conduit-jam-packed/

Crain’s New York Business recently published an article on the crowded conduit under New York City. The article complements the April 7 edition of This Week in Crain’s New York podcast, hosted by Don Mathisen.

Empire City Subway (ECS), the crumbling subterranean network of conduit for telephone wires constructed in 1888, is so crowded underground construction crews regularly need to detour to reach their destination. Routes are no longer direct, adding precious nanoseconds to data delivery – a significant problem for competitive finance companies.

Verizon owns ECS and, according to the article, does not operate with competitors in mind:

But businesses that lease space in the ECS network for their own fiber-optic cable say that Verizon doesn’t worry about keeping the system clear for others. Conduits are filled with cables from defunct Internet providers that went belly-up after the dot-com bust in 2000. Verizon itself left severed copper wire in lower Manhattan ducts after installing a fiber-optic network following Superstorm Sandy. (The company says the cables could be easily removed, if needed.)

Stealth Communications spent an extra $100,000 in March to re-route its fiber from Rockefeller Center to Columbus Circle. Conduit was so congested along the planned route, the independent ISP needed to go 6,500 feet out of its way. The re-route added almost two weeks to the project.

Crain’s contacted Chris Mitchell from ILSR:

“It’s foolish to think that we can just leave it to the market to use this limited space under the street efficiently,” Mr. Mitchell said. “The fiber needs are tremendous, and if New York over time can expand access to a lot of fiber at low cost, we’ll see all kinds of [innovation].”

He added that New York might be best served by the public-utility model embraced by Stockholm and Santa Monica, Calif., and under consideration now in Baltimore, in which the city builds a fiber backbone. Internet service providers lease access to that fiber at low cost and compete to offer specialized services as part of the “last-mile” connection to the home or business.

Possible solutions being considered include municipal fiber to lower income neighborhoods, requiring changes from ECS, and stringing fiber along aboveground transportation tracks. The ultimate goal is to create conditions that will increase competition

But something must be done to improve ECS, industry veterans say; otherwise, the conduits will only become harder to use. “The more you have to get around, the more cable you put in the street,” said Brad Ickes, president of independent provider Optical Communications Group. (OCG and Verizon have been locked in a legal dispute since 2008.) “And then everything gets more congested, because everyone is going that way.”