Where are communities taking charge of their energy future? Which states give communities the most power? ILSR’s Community Power Map provides an interactive illustration of how communities are accelerating the transition toward 100% renewable energy and how state policies help or hinder greater local action. Scroll down for a map guide, state score methodology, or to suggest map updates. Zoom out for Alaska or Hawaii.

How to Use the Map

The map provides markers to show local activity and layers to highlight state policies. The markers include:

  • Local Community Renewable Energy Projects, mostly community solar and community wind, like those we feature in our Local Energy Rules podcast
  • Community Groups that are helping take charge of their community’s energy future
  • 100% Renewable or Climate commitments by cities, including commitments for municipal buildings only, or entire cities (learn more about national or international 100% renewable campaigns)
  • Utility (Feed-in) Tariffs that allow small power producers a simplified path to selling energy from new, distributed renewable energy projects into the electric system.
  • Municipal utilities–city-owned electric utilities
  • Active CCAs (Community Choice Aggregations)–communities that, empowered by state law, decide where they buy their energy from
  • Inclusive Financing programs allowing energy customers to make energy efficiency or renewable energy investments without taking out a loan
  • Active PACE (Property Assessed Clean Energy) Programs allowing energy customers to finance renewable energy and energy efficiency on their property tax bill (more from PACENow)

The layers include:

  • The State Community Power (CP) Score, a value assigned each state based on its policies supporting local energy action.
  • Net Metering policies, including those that allow customers to aggregate their energy use across multiple buildings or generate energy off-site (data from DSIRE)
  • Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing laws that allow communities to set up repayment programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy through the property tax system (data from PACENOW)
  • Community Choice Aggregation laws allowing cities to choose their energy suppliers on behalf of all residential and small commercial customers (data from LEAN Energy US and others)
  • State (Feed-In) Tariffs that allow small power producers a simplified path to selling energy from new, distributed renewable energy projects into the electric system.
  • Residential Energy Building Codes that allow cities to set higher standards than the state, or give cities the ultimate authority
  • State Renewable Portfolio Standard Carve-Outs for solar or distributed renewable energy that require utility companies to purchase renewable electricity specifically from small-scale sources (data from DSIRE)
  • Interconnection Scores for the ease of installing and connecting renewable energy to the grid, from the Interstate Renewable Energy Council’s Freeing the Grid report
  • Shared Renewables programs allowing customers to share a slice of a renewable energy project without having to own a suitable space for a wind turbine or solar panel (most data from SharedRenewablesHQ)

State Community Power Score Methodology

The Community Power Score assigns points to each state based on its policy environment for supporting local energy action. It includes points for all of the state policies in the map above. The scoring is as follows:

Community Choice Aggregation 7 points for having a state policy allowing communities to choose their electricity supply
Net Metering 5 points for a net metering policy, +1 for also having aggregate net metering
State Renewable Portfolio Standard Carve-Outs 5 points for a distributed generation or solar-specific renewable portfolio standard
Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) 3 points for Residential or Commercial PACE, 5 points for both
Residential Energy Building Codes 1 point for a state-set code, 3 points for local authority with no state code, 5 points for a state code with local stretch code
State (Feed-in) Tariffs 3 points for having a state feed-in tariff
Shared Renewables 3 points for a state-required community renewables program
Interconnection 0 for an average grade from IREC on policies for connecting renewables to the grid, +1 for a B, +2 for an A. -2 or -1, respectively, for an F or D grade.

Help Us Improve the Map!

Inevitably, we missed some of the exciting local renewable energy projects happening around the nation. That’s where you come in. Fill out our form and we will be continually be updating our map.

Tell Us About Local Renewable Energy Projects We Missed