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U.S. Climate Negotiator Calls for Feed-in Tariffs

| Written by John Farrell | 2 Comments | Updated on Dec 7, 2011 The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/us-climate-negotiator-calls-feed-tariffs/

From a friend at the United Nations climate meeting in Durban, South Africa:

Todd Stern, the head of the climate change negotiating team for the US Government called for Feed-in Tariff policies as key to solve the problem. Stern gave the briefing on December 7th to nearly 300 environmental group leaders in Durban, South Africa at the UN Climate Change negotiations. One of his major points was that the US and countries worldwide need to utilize the Feed-in Tariff approach in order to transform the energy production sector of society. While there was at best, luke warm, reception to his overall presentation of the US negotiating position, the crowd was impressed with his recognition of the transformative power of the German style renewable energy (Feed-in) approach. By providing investor security these policies have proven to be the fastest way to get gigawatts of good energy on line the quickest. As they say, when the house is on fire speed matters. [emphasis added]

Since feed-in tariffs are responsible for nearly two-thirds of the world’s wind power and 90 percent of the world’s solar, it’s a policy that would make sense for the American energy market.

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About John Farrell

John Farrell directs the Energy Self-Reliant States and Communities program at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and he focuses on energy policy developments that best expand the benefits of local ownership and dispersed generation of renewable energy. More

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  • http://theenergyfix.com Anonymous

    How come most of the mainstream media are missing this in their coverage?

  • http://www.uwec.edu/StudentSenate/commissions/sos/ Ben Ponkratz

    I really hope this gains some traction in the U.S. like it has elsewhere in the world!