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common-cause-network-neutrality-and-the-fcc-come-together-in-episode-73-of-community-broadband-bits-podcast
Article filed under Broadband | Written by Christopher | No Comments | Updated on Nov 19, 2013

Common Cause, Network Neutrality, and the FCC Come Together in Episode 73 of Community Broadband Bits Podcast

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.muninetworks.org/content/common-cause-network-neutrality-and-fcc-come-together-episode-73-community-broadband-bits

We welcome Todd O’Boyle of the good government group Common Cause to our Community Broadband Bits podcast this week. He is the Director of the Media and Democracy program there, which recently released an explanation of network neutrality in comic form, which we discuss in our discussion. We also talk about the impression of municipal… Continue reading

common-cause-network-neutrality-comic
Article filed under Broadband | Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Nov 7, 2013

Common Cause Network Neutrality Comic

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://www.muninetworks.org/content/common-cause-network-neutrality-comic

We have reported on network neutrality many times in the past. This has been a policy debate on whether Internet service providers should be able to prioritize some content at the expense of others – should Comcast be able to charge me more to visit Fox News than it does to reach MSNBC? Should it… Continue reading

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Article, ILSR Press Room, Resource filed under Broadband | Written by Lisa Gonzalez | No Comments | Updated on Mar 6, 2013

“The Monopoly Magnate”

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/ilsr-launches-new-comic/

ILSR is following HB 282, restrictive legislation moving through the Georgia General Assembly. The bill would effectively end the ability for existing networks to expand. Communities considering investing in their own telecommunications networks would face almost insurmountable financial and practical hurdles. As the bill is heavily lobbied by incumbent telecom giants, local leaders make the… Continue reading