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Resource filed under The Public Good | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Aug 5, 1999

The New Rules Journal – Summer 1999

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/new-rules-journal-summer-1999/

Feature Stories: The Buck Starts-and-Stops Here, Getting a Slice of the Pie, States Take the Bull by the Horn, Now We Have Plenty of Bananas, Microradio Struggles to Regain a Place on the Dial, and Outlandish Taxes.

Place Rules: Consumer coupons could boost local business in Japan, Indie bookstores break ground online at booksense.com, and Mayors and counties charge pro-industry slant on Congressional e-commerce tax commission.

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Resource filed under The Public Good | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Feb 5, 1999

The New Rules Journal – Winter 1999

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/new-rules-journal-winter-1999/

Feature Stories: The National Bank Robbery — Franchising: The Worst of Both Worlds — Seeing the Light — Paying for Past Mistakes — Sound Decisions — Making Waves. Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 1, 1999

Complex Recycling Issues: Strategies for Record-Setting Waste Reduction in Multi-Family Dwellings

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/complex-recycling-issues-strategies-for-record-setting-waste-reduction-in-multi-family-dwellings/

Multi-family buildings are often overlooked when communities offer their residents recycling services. This fact sheet packet features four model apartment buildings and complexes, from garden apartments to high-rises, that are recycling between 20 and 65% of their discarded materials. Also profiled are five communities that provide recycling service to their multi-family dwelling sector. by Kelly… Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jan 1, 1999

Cutting the Waste Stream in Half: Community Record-Setters Show How

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/cutting-the-waste-stream-in-half-community-record-setters-show-how/

This report and fact sheet packet of the same title feature 18 cities and counties recovering 40 to 65% of their residential waste. They profile each community’s program, drivers for waste reduction levels, materials accepted, set-out and collection methods, and equipment and operating costs. The fact sheet packet summarizes and complements the full report. Essential… Continue reading

Deconstruction salvaging yesterday's buildings
Resource filed under Deconstruction, Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by Neil Seldman | No Comments | Updated on Jan 1, 1999

Deconstruction: Salvaging Yesterday’s Buildings for Tomorrow’s Sustainable Communities

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/deconstruction-salvaging-yesterdays-buildings-for-tomorrows-sustainable-communities-2/

Deconstruction is the process of carefully dismantling a building in order to salvage components for reuse and recycling. This report provides information to understand and advocate for deconstruction locally, regionally, and nationally, emphasizing partnerships with local nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and for-profit practitioners. A collaborative project of the Materials for the Future Foundation (San Francisco)… Continue reading

Resource filed under The Public Good | Written by David Morris | 2 Comments | Updated on Nov 15, 1998

Don’t Bribe ‘Em. Buy ‘Em: A strategic proposal on how New Yorkers can create–and control–a minor baseball league of their own

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/dont-bribe-em-buy-em-strategic-proposal-how-new-yorkers-can-createand-controla-minor-baseball-league/

Inthe next two years, New Yorkers will spend nearly $50 million dollars to build two stadiums for minor league teams in order to lure away short-season, class A ball clubs from other communities. And in ten years? New Yorkers may well have to consider building bigger stadiums for those same teams so they don’t threaten to move as the Yankees are now doing. A better idea: For the same amount of taxpayer money, New Yorkers can create–and own–a minor league comprised of several good ball clubs and still have money left over to put toward stadiums. And New Yorkers can–for years to come–root for teams that are truly rooted in their own community.

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filed under Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Nov 14, 1998

ILSR’s U.S. EPA-Sponsored Waste Reduction Project

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/13049/

ILSR’s Waste Reduction Record-Setters project (1996-2000), funded under an U.S. EPA grant, identified and documented record-setting waste reduction programs in the public and private sectors. The project identified 100 communities and nearly 200 businesses, institutions, and other organizations reporting waste reduction — the combination of waste prevention and recycling — rates at 50 percent or… Continue reading

Resource filed under Independent Business, The Public Good | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Nov 5, 1998

Place Matters Conference Summary

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/place-matters-conference-summary/

The Place Matters Conference, held on November 12, 1998 in St. Paul, Minnesota, drew together a mix of businesses, organizations and individuals who, by their very nature, believe that place does indeed matter. These participants were all firmly anchored in their communities, representing small businesses, financial institutions, community-based nonprofits, farmers, and local governments in Minnesota. They were a mix of people who did not normally interact, yet had much in common. They shared a remarkably similar recent history: economic and public policy trends that had made their long-term viability much more tenuous and uncertain. Continue reading

Resource filed under Energy | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Nov 5, 1998

Replacing Utility Property Taxes In Minnesota With Revenues from a Carbon-Based Tax

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/replacing-utility-property-taxes-minnesota-revenues-carbonbased-tax/

This policy brief by David Morris and John Bailey from November 1998, looked at potential changes to utility property taxes in Minnesota. The state was re-examining the utility tax structure in light of the restructuring of electricity occurring throughout the country.  The rationale for this re-examination is that if Minnesota were to deregulate its electricity sector, customers would be able to buy electricity from any supplier.  If taxes were imposed on in-state power plants but not on out-of-state suppliers, it would result in a competitive disadvantage to in-state generators. Continue reading

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Resource filed under Energy | Written by David Morris | No Comments | Updated on Nov 5, 1998

Taxes, Agriculture, and Climate Change

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/taxes-agriculture-and-climate-change/

This Novemeber 1998 report by David Morris and John Bailey examines the impact of a proposed $1.5 billion ecological tax shift proposal on Minnesota’s agricultural sector. Overall, the net impact is beneficial for Minnesota farmers that are growing crops. On a statewide level, the carbon tax raises costs to farmers by about $59.1 million while the property tax reduction lowers costs by $92 million. The benefit varies by crop and by farm size. Soybean farmers do better than corn farmers, large farmers do better than small farmers. Continue reading

Resource filed under Composting, Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Nov 1, 1998

DON’T THROW AWAY THAT FOOD: Strategies for Record-Setting Waste Reduction

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/dont-throw-away-that-food-strategies-for-record-setting-waste-reduction/

The Institute for Local Self-Reliance’s Waste Reduction Record-Setters Project fosters development of exceptional waste reduction programs by documenting successful ones. These programs can be used as models for others implementing their own programs to reduce garbage. The Don’t Throw Away That Food information packet below is oriented toward commercial and institutional food discard generators, and… Continue reading

Resource filed under Waste to Wealth, Zero Waste & Economic Development | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Oct 1, 1998

Government and Community-Based Sources and Strategies for Financing Recycling Enterprises

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/governmentcommunity-based-sources-and-strategies-for-financing-recycling-enterprises/

Prepared for the National Recycling Coalition by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, this report discusses recent developments in community and small business financing, identifies barriers and current needs, and outlines steps for linking recycling-based community development and small business financing. Appendices list and survey prominent community development corporations and finance institutions. Download PDF (147 KB) Continue reading

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Resource filed under The Public Good | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 5, 1998

The New Rules Journal – Summer 1998 (Groundwork)

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/new-rules-journal-summer-1998-groundwork/

Feature Stories: Owning Your Own Economy, Masters of Our Destiny, Bits Bytes and Community, and Rooting for the Home Team

Place Rules: Good rules make a difference but only if they have muscle, Devolving power, and Traditional road design in the back seat.

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Article, Resource, Rule filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States, The Public Good | Written by David Morris | No Comments | Updated on May 12, 1998

Tax Polluters, Not Families and Businesses

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/post-2772/

TheEconomic Efficiency and Pollution Reduction Act of 1998 completely eliminates school district’s general education property tax levy and finances it at the state level through a tax on pollution. Continue reading

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filed under The Public Good | Written by David Morris | No Comments | Updated on Apr 1, 1998

Roots, Roots, Roots for the Home Team: Community-Owned Professional Sports

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/roots-roots-roots-home-team-communityowned-professional-sports/

Community ownership of professional sports teams is an idea with decades of successful experience. The Green Bay Packers have been operating as a nonprofit corporation since 1923, during which time they have won three world championships and three Super Bowls, and have recently financed two stadium upgrades from retained earnings. Their ownership structure has generated unprecedented fan support while maintaining the fiscal discipline exhibited by corporations.  This report by David Morris and Daniel Kraker takes a closer look at the issues surrounding community owned sports. Continue reading