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Article filed under Biomaterials, Composting, Waste to Wealth | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

Why Consider Compostable Food Service Products?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/why-consider-compostable-food-service-products/

ILSR’s new fact sheet on “FAQs: Why Choose Compostable Products for Food Service” explains what constitutes compostable products, where they are available, and the importance of working with local composters to ensure they are composted. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

The Power of Comprehensive Energy Policy

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/power-comprehensive-energy-policy/

If Germany’s 16 federal states had each enacted their own renewable energy legislation, we’d have far less solar energy usage. I often tell people that Germany has 400 types of beer and one renewables law, while the situation in the United States is the other way around.

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Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

Could California Save 30% or More on Solar With German Policy?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/could-california-save-30-or-more-solar-german-policy-2/

The Golden State has covered over 50,000 roofs with solar PV in the past decade, but could it also save 30% or more on its current solar costs?  Renewable energy guru Paul Gipe wrote up a study last week that found that Californians pay much more per kilowatt-hour of solar power than Germans do (accounting for the difference in the solar resource). The following chart outlines the various ways Californians pay for solar, compared to the Germans (averaged over 20 years, per kilowatt-hour produced).

While the study doesn’t explore the rationale, here are a few possibilities:

  1. The inefficiency of federal tax credits artificially inflates the cost of U.S. solar.
  2. Big banks that offer financing for residential solar leasing routinely overstate the value of the systems, increasing taxpayer costs on otherwise cost-effective systems.
  3. The complexity and intricacy of the state and federal incentives (4 separate pots of money!) and the lack of guaranteed interconnection means higher risk and higher cost for U.S. solar projects.
  4. The inconsistency in local permitting standards that increases project overhead costs.

Ultimately, the combination of these market-dampening problems in the California market has hindered the cost savings that have hit the German market.  California solar installations of 25 kilowatts (kW) and 100 kW have a quoted price of $4.36 and $3.84 per Watt, respectively, according to the Clean Coalition.  This compares to $3.40 per Watt on average for already installed projects of 10-100 kW in Germany.   

Given a solar cost disadvantage that is present both in the value of incentives AND in the actual installed cost, renewable energy advocates in California should seriously question whether the current policy framework makes sense. The mish-mash of federal tax credits and state/utility rebates has not led to the same economies of scale and market maturity as Germany has accomplished with their CLEAN contract (a.k.a. feed-in tariff).  

Switching energy policies could save ratepayers billions. 

A 24-cent CLEAN contract price for California solar (to match the German contract) would replace the entire slate of existing solar incentives with an overall average cost 30% lower than the current combined incentives.  If 2011 is a banner year and the state sees 1 gigawatt (GW) of installed capacity, the savings to ratepayers of a CLEAN program (over 20 years) would be nearly $3 billion.

If the CLEAN price were adjusted down to assume that projects could use the federal tax credit, then California could set the contract price as low as 18.5 cents per kWh, 5 cents less than is currently paid by California ratepayers (although requiring projects to use tax credits has significant liabilities). 

Several states and municipal utilities (Vermont; Gainesville, FL; San Antonio, TX) have already shifted to this simple, comprehensive policy, with promising early results.  Californians should consider whether holding to an outdated and complicated energy policy is worth paying billions of dollars extra for solar power.

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Article, ILSR Press Room, Resource filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 13, 2011

John Farrell talks about Democratizing the Electricity System on the Progressive Radio Network

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/john-farrell-talks-about-democratizing-electricity-system-progressive-radio-network/

SolarTimes editor Sandy LeonVest in conversation with energy researcher John Farrell, of the Institute for Local Self Reliance. They discuss “energy democracy” and John Farrell’s recently published report, “Democratizing the Electricity System.” Continue reading

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Article filed under The Public Good, The Public Good News | Written by David Morris | 1 Comment | Updated on Jul 7, 2011

Why is the Most Wasteful Government Agency Not Part of the Deficit Discussion?

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/why-is-the-most-wasteful-government-agency-not-part-of-the-deficit-discussion/

In all the talk about the federal deficit, why is the single largest culprit left out of the conversation?  Why is the one part of government that best epitomizes everything conservatives say they hate about government— waste, incompetence, and corruption—all but exempt from conservative criticism? Of course, I’m talking about the Pentagon.  Any serious battle… Continue reading

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Article, Resource filed under Broadband | Written by ILSR Admin | No Comments | Updated on Jul 6, 2011

Community Fiber Networks Better than DSL, Cable Networks

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/new-video-community-fiber-networks-better-dsl-cable-networks/

With the vast majority of Americans greatly overpaying for slow and unreliable broadband compared to connections in Europe and Asia, hundreds of communities have started building their own networks. Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | 1 Comment | Updated on Jul 6, 2011

The Political and Technical Advantages of Distributed Generation

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/political-and-technical-advantages-distributed-generation/

A serialized version of our new report, Democratizing the Electricity System, Part 3 of 5. Click here for: Part 1 (The Electric System: Inflection Point) Part 2 (The Economics of Distributed Generation) Download the report. The Political and Technical Advantages of Distributed Generation While technology has helped change the economics of electricity production (in favor… Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 5, 2011

Electricity Home Rule Could Mean Economic Boost of $1.5 Billion and 14,500 jobs for DC

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/electricity-home-rule-could-mean-economic-boost-15-billion-and-14500-jobs-dc/

Update 8/11/11: While maximizing solar in DC shifts $267 million in electricity payments from the utility to local solar panels, the cumulative electricity cost savings over 25 years amounts to $1.6 billion for ratepayers by shifting to solar power.

For many years the citizens of Washington, DC, struggled for the basic right to elect their own leaders.  In 2011, they should use their political home rule to maximize the economic benefits of local renewable energy with “electricity home rule.”

Currently, residents and businesses in Washington spend over $1.5 billion dollars a year on electricity.  According to a study of DC’s energy dollars by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, 90% of that amount (largely unchanged since the 1979 study) – $1.4 billion – leaves the city.  

With rooftop solar power, DC residents could keep more of those electricity dollars at home.

In its recently published atlas of state renewable energy potential, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) found that the District of Columbia could generate 19% of its electricity from rooftop solar PV systems.  That’s $267 million spent on electricity bills that could be kept locally. 

But maximizing local electricity generation with rooftop solar has enormous additional economic benefits.  To fill District roofs with solar panels, residents would need to install just over 1,800 megawatts (MW) of rooftop solar.  The National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates that every megawatt of solar generates $240,000 in additional economic activity, making the economic value of maximizing solar energy self-reliance close to $432 million.  

It could go even higher.  

A previous NREL study of the value of local ownership of renewable (wind) energy found that it multiplied the economic benefits from 1.5 to 3.4 times.  If D.C. residents maximized local ownership of solar, it could have an economic value as high as $1.5 billion, equivalent to the District’s total electricity bill.

The 1,800 MW of solar would also generate jobs.  With a rule of thumb of 8 jobs per MW, according to a University of California, Berkeley, study of the jobs created from renewable energy development, the District could get as many as 14,500 jobs from maximizing its solar energy self-reliance.

The cost of going solar is minimal.  At current best prices for solar PV (around $3.50 per Watt installed) and with the benefit of the 30% federal Investment Tax Credit, solar PV can deliver electricity to the District for 16.1 cents per kilowatt-hour.  After seven years at current electricity inflation rates (3% per year), solar PV – with zero fuel cost or inflation – would be less expensive than retail grid electricity (currently 13.3 cents per kWh).  And unlike the $267 million currently sent out of the district for that electricity, all of it would be kept at home.

The solar power offers much more than just affordable electricity.  Recent studies have suggested that the actual value of solar power to the grid and environment far exceeds the value of the sun-powered electricity.  And ILSR’s recent report on Democratizing the Electricity System illustrates how solar power and other distributed renewable energy sources are the cornerstone of a transformation to a decentralized, more democratic energy system.

Citizens of DC should take the opportunity presented by their solar resource and pursue electricity home rule.

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Article filed under Independent Business | Written by Stacy Mitchell | No Comments | Updated on Jul 1, 2011

California Requires Internet Retailers to Collect Sales Tax

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/california-requires-internet-retailers-collect-sales-tax/

In what may well be the tipping point in a decade-long fight to level the playing field for local brick-and-mortar businesses, California this week enacted a law requiring Amazon and other large online retailers to collect state sales tax.  Continue reading

Article filed under Energy, Energy Self-Reliant States | Written by John Farrell | No Comments | Updated on Jun 30, 2011

The Economics of Distributed Generation

The content that follows was originally published on the Institute for Local Self-Reliance website at http://ilsr.org/economics-distributed-generation/

A serialized version of our new report, Democratizing the Electricity System, Part 2 of 5.  Click here for Part 1 or here to download the report. The falling cost of distributed renewable generation has been one of the key drivers of the transformation of the U.S. electric grid. The following chart illustrates the cost of… Continue reading